Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age

[Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age]
Year: 
2015
Public: 
Publisher: 
Penguin Books
Year of publication: 
2016
Pages: 
448
Moral Assessment: 
Type: Thought
Nothing inappropriate.
Requires prior general knowledge of the subject.
Readers with knowledgeable about the subject matter.
Contains doctrinal errors of some importance.
Whilst not being explicitly against the faith, the general approach or its main points are ambiguous or opposed to the Church’s teachings.
Incompatible with Catholic doctrine.
Quality: 
Recomendable: 
Transmits values: 
Sexual content: 
Violent content: 
Vulgar language: 
Ideas that contradict Church teaching: 
The rating of the different categories comes from the opinion of Delibris' collaborators

The author, professor of Sociology of Science and Technology in MIT (Boston), offers valuable research and advice about how to avoid being overwhelmed with the various technology available for use. The seriousness of the investigation and the quantity of data that support the affirmations, as well as author’s prestige, helps to understand that the book presents observations and practical advice that cannot be labeled as moralistic. For example, we receive - from the people that have collaborated on pilot projects of robots in the field of healthcare - suggestions and indications on how to develop one’s own interiority and how to grow in empathy which is at a risk of being made obsolete by the excess technology that ‘devours‘ our dialogues and makes us avoid ‘face to face’ interactions.

It is this seriousness that makes the book compelling and relevant. It can be very useful for educators and parents. There is no a priori demonization of the means of communication which, of course, the author appreciates and knows more deeply than the average reader. If we really want to find a drawback in the book (and it is difficult to do so) we can point out its length (about 400 pages) which may discourage some readers; but this is compensated by the simple and easily readable style.

Author: Matteo Fabbri, Italy, 2019