Testimony of Hope

[Testimoni Della Speranza]
Year: 
2002
Public: 
Publisher: 
Pauline
Year of publication: 
2000
Pages: 
222
Moral Assessment: 
Type: Thought
Nothing inappropriate.
Requires prior general knowledge of the subject.
Readers with knowledgeable about the subject matter.
Contains doctrinal errors of some importance.
Whilst not being explicitly against the faith, the general approach or its main points are ambiguous or opposed to the Church’s teachings.
Incompatible with Catholic doctrine.
Quality: 
Recomendable: 
Transmits values: 
Sexual content: 
Violent content: 
Vulgar language: 
Ideas that contradict Church teaching: 
The rating of the different categories comes from the opinion of Delibris' collaborators

This book gathers the meditations of the spiritual retreat of the year 2000, preached by Cardinal Van Thuan and attended by Pope John Paul II and the Roman Curia. Their central theme is the hope of the Church, facing the beginning of the new millennium; and they are a first-hand testimony of the persecution that the author suffered under the communist regime of Vietnam, where he was imprisoned for 15 years in concentration camps.

Through the various talks, the exceptional intelligence of the author, who is a true shepherd of souls, can be seen. In addition, he tells us about a period in the history of the Church in Vietnam and the experience of persecution. The stories told are both moving and impressive. He tells many anecdotes of his prison: how he meditated on the life of Jesus; how he taught Gregorian chants to the guards; how to celebrate Mass, with 2 drops of wine and a crumb of bread in the palm of his hand; the process of conversion of guards and prisoners; his spiritual retreat in prison; among many other events. 

Behind each of the anecdotes that he narrates, Cardinal Van Thuan discovers the hand of God, and shows Christian hope in a positive way. A book that will serve all those who want to come closer to God through a spiritual reflection on the second theological virtue. 

 

Author: Jorge Gaspar, Portugal, 2018