Irreversible Damage: Teenage Girls and the Transgender Craze

[Irreversible Damage: Teenage Girls and the Transgender Craze]
Year: 
2020
Public: 
Publisher: 
Regnery
Year of publication: 
2020
Pages: 
231
Moral assessment: 
Type: Thought
Nothing inappropriate.
Requires prior general knowledge of the subject.
Readers with knowledgeable about the subject matter.
Contains doctrinal errors of some importance.
Whilst not being explicitly against the faith, the general approach or its main points are ambiguous or opposed to the Church’s teachings.
Incompatible with Catholic doctrine.
Quality: 
Recomendable: 
Transmits values: 
Sexual content: 
Violent content: 
Vulgar language: 
Ideas that contradict Church teaching: 
The rating of the different categories comes from the opinion of Delibris' collaborators

Abigail Shrier is a writer for The Wall Street Journal. After writing an article for the newspaper in 2017 concerning Transgenderism and the suppression of free speech she was contacted by mothers whose daughters had suddenly started to self-identify as boys, and were even beginning transgender therapy. This lead her to investigate the phenomenon of the huge rise in Rapid Onset Gender Dysphoria (ROGD) among teenage girls (a ten-fold increase in the USA and a forty-fold increase in Britain over ten years). What she found is truly disturbing. Her research showed her that girls in the early teens, typically white, well-off, socially awkward, high-achievers were being lead into nothing short of a transgender cult through the internet. Typically these girls seek to flee the great challenges of adolescence (such the competition for popularity, concern with physical appearance especially with the onset of bodily changes at puberty, relations with boys, the fear of aggressive male sexuality aggravated by porn, and ultimately depression) by identifying as transgender. This allows them exchange the stigma of white privileged for the kudos of oppressed minority. It also gains them a "glitter family" (especially online) where they feel unconditionally loved and supported.

At the same time, their schools, universities, psychologists and doctors collude with the fiction that their psychological trauma will be solved by transitioning to the opposite sex, often deliberately without the knowledge of the child's parents, or else emotionally blackmailing parents with the prospect of the suicide of their daughter if she is preventing from transitioning. Shrier interviews many of these girls, their parents, psychologists and doctors. She describes in detail the effects of puberty blockers, testosterone treatment, mastectomies, and phalloplasty. She also interviews young women who deeply regret the transgender treatment they received and resent in particular the medical profession that facilitated their transition with no attention to the underlying causes of the ROGD in the first place. This is all done with great sensitivity to the families involved. This is certainly an important book for parents of young girls. 

Author: Gavan Jennings, Ireland, 2021